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145. Book Review | Win Bigly by Scott Adams

I read Scott Adam’s Win Bigly a couple years after the election of Donald Trump, and it was then that I realized what happened in that election. Up until then, I thought it was a bit lucky with some skill combined with the fact he was up against a hubristic Democrat party and the most unlikeable candidate in recent history.

“In making a speech one must study three points: first, the means of producing persuasion; second, the language; third the proper arrangement of the various parts of the speech.”

-Aristotle

In his book, Scott Adams shows that this was no fluke, and describes the tactics that the Trump campaign used to take the white house. While this sounds like a political book, it really is a modern version of How to Win Friends and Influence People. You’ll learn the strategy, tactics, and overall art of persuading people.

Grab your copy of Win Bigly here.

This book offers a lot of insight into how effective political messaging is (and really any sort of marketing message), but it does so without rooting for a political party. Scott Adams doesn’t let his political beliefs get in the way of observing how effective politicians are. And, I think that is yet another lesson we can learn from this book.

Enjoy solving today’s problems with the wisdom of the past? Join the Conversation of Our Generation.

163. Book Review | The Analects, The Doctrine Of The Mean, and The Great Learning by Confucius Conversation of Our Generation

I wanted to review the Doctrine of the Mean and the Analects because I think they are full of amazing wisdom. Confucius is, in my opinion, on par with some of the greatest Greek philosophers. Having now read more of Plato’s work, I would compare these works to something like the Symposium or Republic. The question-and-answer style is very engaging and I think makes for a good demonstration of how to discuss ideas. The Wisdom of The Analects This is a readable, short discourse on morality, propriety, and virtue. It is an incredibly insightful work that delves into a range of topics, each one focused on making people better. Also, it has a familiar form of discourse where Confucius’ students ask him questions and he answers. To those who’ve read works by Plato or the Gospels, these techniques will be familiar and, in my opinion, inviting. “The superior man is catholic, not partisan.” -Confucius Although Confucius is from China, his ideas are incredibly similar to what we find in western philosophy. Furthermore, I believe the ideas expressed give a unique perspective since they don’t come from the West. Despite the similarity, there are differences that come out of this work in comparison to one from Aristotle or Thomas Aquinas. But, there is tremendous wisdom in this for anyone who is seeking truth. Grab your copy of The Complete Confucius: The Analects, The Doctrine Of The Mean, and The Great Learning What is the Doctrine of the Mean? The mean is an idea that exists in both in the East and West, and has a number of expressions. Different expressions of the Doctrine of the Mean are due to the fact it’s hard to pin down exactly. Aristotle, Confucius, Lao Tzu, and others have sought to explain the mean. Basically, the mean boils down to how to act morally and ethically. “Learning without thought is labor lost; thought without learning is perilous.” Confucius Enjoy solving today’s problems with the wisdom of the past? Join the Conversation of Our Generation. — This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conofourgen/support
  1. 163. Book Review | The Analects, The Doctrine Of The Mean, and The Great Learning by Confucius
  2. 162. How To Engage In Discussions – Conversation The WGN Podcast
  3. 161. Book Review | Titus Andronicus By William Shakespeare
  4. 160. Restoring Traditional Architecture – Zach the Architect Interview
  5. 159. Book Review | Jefferson’s Great Gamble by Charles Cerami [A look at the Louisiana Purchase]

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