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167. Book Review | Nineteenth-Century Thought by Richard Schoenwald

A lot of change started happening in the 18th century and by the 19th century it was full steam ahead. With change came a lot of difficulty adapting. Due to that difficulty, a new school of thought arose. Thus, nineteenth century thought was marked by a grappling with change and how to handle it. Political thought went through a transformation in the wake of this new school of thought.

“I have called this principle, by which each slight variation, if useful, is preserved, by the term of Natural Selection.”

Charles Darwin

Watch the full review of Nineteenth Century Thought

How These Philosophers Laid the Groundwork of Progressivism

Progressivism preaches an inevitable outcome – that we are marching toward some future state regardless of our choice. However, this is largely unfounded. Thinkers like Darwin and Marx have been largely proven wrong. Although their ideas weren’t completely demolished, their body of work has taken numerous hits. Instead of marching toward inevitable utopia, we have wavered between progress and regress.

“All political revolutions, not affected by foreign conquest, originate in moral revolutions. The subversion of established institutions is merely one consequence of the previous subversion of established opinions.”

John Stuart Mill

“>Grab your copy of Nineteenth-Century Thought: The Discovery of Change

This book is a dense read, for sure. Despite that, I really enjoyed it. But, you will have to dedicate some attention and energy to this book as you read it. If you do, I think you’ll get a lot out of it. The way it’s laid out is very interesting. Simply put, it is a collection of works and writing from several different authors. You’ll get input from writers like Marx, Darwin, John Stuart Mill and more. So, if you want to learn more about the groundwork of Progressivism, this book is for you.

188. Finding Unity and Mending a Divided Nation Conversation of Our Generation

Our country is obviously divided, politically, culturally, and religiously. Despite living in the same country under the same laws, we have two separate nations in our country. In this episode, I'll discuss mending a divided nation and how we find unity amid all the chaos. How We're Divided We have divided ourselves in many ways across this country. We've separated ourselves into religious and secular, conservative and liberal, coastal and heartland, and in numerous other ways. With all of these differences, how can we even say we're one country? Discussions of secession come up on both sides of the political aisle, and many take it as an inevitability. What is dividing us? Mainstream Media, politicians, educational systems and numerous institutions seek to tear us apart instead of bringing us together. "Even if a unity of faith is not possible, a unity of love is." -Hans Urs von Balthasar Methods for Mending a Divided Nation I've spoken previously about what we need to come together, but I'm going to recap some of those thoughts. Basically, I think we need to first see each other as fellow human beings, fellow citizens. Rather than seeing political opponents as evil or vicious, we should see our friend or family member who holds those views in each person. We easily jump to conclusions about people instead of trying to understand them. So, if we are to have a healthy political and cultural life, we need to be able to discuss politics well. This means we have to know our own beliefs and biases, and discuss ideas with knowledge of our own potential pitfalls. We need to learn the lessons of the past and seek to mend and understand each other without wanting to dominate or control each other. — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conofourgen/support
  1. 188. Finding Unity and Mending a Divided Nation
  2. 187. The Common Sense We Need | Book Review
  3. 186. Smiles Matter, Problems With COVID Lockdowns
  4. 185. Civil Unrest in Shakespeare's Henry VI
  5. 184. Crazy Elections in America's Past

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