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132. Is America Worth Defending?

Is America irredeemable? Is it an intrinsically evil place, built on evil principles? Or, is it a place worth defending?

“A battle lost or won is easily described, understood, and appreciated, but the moral growth of a great nation requires reflection, as well as observation, to appreciate it.”

Frederick Douglass

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Is America even worth defending anymore? Or, is it simply an evil, racist, fascist country? Check out this discussion with The Conversation of Our Generation’s @NickJamell: https://conversationofourgeneration.com/2020/07/06/132-is-america-worth-defending/

The charges being brought against America all too often are numerous. Charges of racism, imperialism, misogyny, greed, and more are thrown around casually, often with complete disregard for the implications. If America is so irredeemable, how can these critics take part in any way?

Are there fair criticisms? Sure. Were there grievous atrocities and injustices committed? Yes. But, that is not an excuse to be complicit in the erasure of history in favor of this Marxist hypothesis.

Why then is it worth defending? The ideals are the answer. A Constitution is not simply a written document. We have a written one to preserve the real constitution and offer the nation’s citizens a means of redress against the government.

However, the constitution in its original sense was the institutions, traditions, culture, politics, and common values that made up the society. It is developed over time, and after 300 years of subsisting as colonies, our founders realized we had broken from the English motherland.

As for these charges, do we find evidence to back them up in the Constitution, Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, and other documents?

No, and that’s why they don’t stick. Not only is there not evidence of these charges, but there’s actually evidence that we led the way in getting rid of many of these things. And that is why America is worth defending.

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189. Learn How to Discuss Ideas from Plato's Symposium Conversation of Our Generation

Plato's Symposium is a great guide on how to discuss ideas. In this book, you'll get an in-depth look at a lengthy discussion about love. Despite having competing theories, the people in this book are able to discuss their ideas amicably. Furthermore, they ask good questions and understand each other's ideas. This helps the conversation dive into a deep discussion, rather than staying at the surface-level. If that interests you at all, listen here to learn more. Learning How To Discuss Ideas This book is a discussion on love between several friends. One is a doctor, some poets, and others are philosophers, but each has an insight into what love is. What I found helpful in learning more about discussing ideas was that the Symposium is written in the form of a dialogue, like Plato's other works. The men take each other's ideas seriously despite being very different and having conflicts. Although they could attack each other's arguments, they decide to put forth ideas and seek truth. Learn About What Socrates Was Like Another part of this book that I love is that you get a good description of Socrates (check the meme below or in this tweet). He was constantly aloof thinking about some other idea, much like a daydreamer. In the beginning of the book Socrates is snapped out of an episode like this and brought along to the party. And, it's at this party where the dialogue for the Symposium begins. "Socrates dropped behind in a fit of abstraction, and desired Aristodemus, who was waiting, to go on before him. When he reached the house of Agathon he found the doors wide open, and a comical thing happened. A servant coming out met him, and led him at once into the banqueting-hall in which the guests were reclining, for the banquet was about to begin. Welcome, Aristodemus, said Agathon, as soon as he appeared–you are just in time to sup with us; if you come on any other matter put it off, and make one of us, as I was looking for you yesterday and meant to have asked you, if I could have found you. But what have you done with Socrates?" -Symposium — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conofourgen/support
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