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132. Is America Worth Defending?

Is America irredeemable? Is it an intrinsically evil place, built on evil principles? Or, is it a place worth defending?

“A battle lost or won is easily described, understood, and appreciated, but the moral growth of a great nation requires reflection, as well as observation, to appreciate it.”

Frederick Douglass

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Is America even worth defending anymore? Or, is it simply an evil, racist, fascist country? Check out this discussion with The Conversation of Our Generation’s @NickJamell: https://conversationofourgeneration.com/2020/07/06/132-is-america-worth-defending/

The charges being brought against America all too often are numerous. Charges of racism, imperialism, misogyny, greed, and more are thrown around casually, often with complete disregard for the implications. If America is so irredeemable, how can these critics take part in any way?

Are there fair criticisms? Sure. Were there grievous atrocities and injustices committed? Yes. But, that is not an excuse to be complicit in the erasure of history in favor of this Marxist hypothesis.

Why then is it worth defending? The ideals are the answer. A Constitution is not simply a written document. We have a written one to preserve the real constitution and offer the nation’s citizens a means of redress against the government.

However, the constitution in its original sense was the institutions, traditions, culture, politics, and common values that made up the society. It is developed over time, and after 300 years of subsisting as colonies, our founders realized we had broken from the English motherland.

As for these charges, do we find evidence to back them up in the Constitution, Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, and other documents?

No, and that’s why they don’t stick. Not only is there not evidence of these charges, but there’s actually evidence that we led the way in getting rid of many of these things. And that is why America is worth defending.

Enjoy solving today’s problems with the wisdom of the past? Join the Conversation of Our Generation.

235. Naturalism & The Human Person | The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly Conversation of Our Generation

According to Wikipedia, Naturalism is "the idea or belief that only natural laws and forces (as opposed to supernatural or spiritual ones) operate in the universe. Adherents of naturalism assert that natural laws are the only rules that govern the structure and behavior of the natural world, and that the changing universe is at every stage a product of these laws." In this episode, I'll take a look at some of the good points and valid concerns of Naturalism. Then, I'll discuss how it falls short, and what corrections it needs. Valid Concerns and Good Points One of the good points of naturalists is that we can attribute most things to natural laws and forces. Every little thing that happens doesn't have to be a supernatural intervention. And, we know it isn't random due to the consistency of events. There is a time in pagan cultures when everything was attributed to the supernatural. Even in the Judeo-Christian world much of the natural order was attributed to angel's intervention. I don't begin to say that I know how Heaven governs this world and it's laws. But it appears to me that there are natural laws and that God created the world with a discoverable order. When looking into that order, it is good to work within it's bounds, which is why we have science. Errors of Naturalism The cause of why I burn my tongue on hot coffee or the sun rises everyday can be naturally accounted for. But, the fact that all these beings exist as well as the laws that govern them, none of which fully account for the existence of the universe, has to have some other explanation. Naturalism cannot account for that. Instead, it seeks for a self-explaining cause that's within the natural order. Furthermore, there are well-attested events that do not fit into the natural world. Inexplicable miracles are one. But, there are phenomena like love and beauty that we do experience. However, the naturalist cannot explain these fully by neurons and brain chemistry. We need a deeper, spiritual explanation if we want to cohere with our universal experience. Corrections There is one major correction a naturalist needs to incorporate all truth into his worldview. That is a recognition of the spiritual. Miracles, religious experiences, emotions, and beauty aren't simply natural phenomena. Rather, they are true experiences of something outside of the natural order. To see this in art, read The Soul of the World, C.S. Lewis, G.K. Chesterton, or Tolkien's Lord of the Rings to see how this plays out. They demonstrate that there is more to this world than the naturalist can explain. And, they do it both with philosophy and story-telling. Related Episodes in this Series What is Objective Reality? What is Subjective Reality? Unity of Subject and Object The Golden Mean for Understanding Objective and Subjective Reality — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/conofourgen/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conofourgen/support
  1. 235. Naturalism & The Human Person | The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
  2. 234. The Golden Mean for Understanding Objective and Subjective Reality
  3. 233. Is Patriotism Good? | Reflections on the 4th of July
  4. 232. Unity of Subject and Object
  5. 231. What is Subjective Reality?
  6. 230. The Death of Socrates And What It Teaches Us Of Courage and Nobility
  7. 229. What is Objective Reality?
  8. 228. Peter Kreeft's Intro to the Summa Theologiae by St. Thomas Aquinas
  9. 227. You're Not A Monk | Unexpected Advice From a Priest
  10. 226. Nicomachean Ethics Book 2, Class 2

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