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187. The Common Sense We Need | Book Review

Common sense is in short supply nowadays. People are up in arms about politics, but should we be? Well, Thomas Paine explains his case for rebellion, and I can say we’re nowhere close to that. After reading his pamphlet arguing for independence, I don’t think we’re anywhere close. So, listen below to find out why. Then, get your copy here so you can read. for yourself.

Get your copy of Common Sense by Thomas Paine here >>

“SOME writers have so confounded society with government, as to leave little or no distinction between them; whereas they are not only different, but have different origins. Society is produced by our wants, and government by our wickedness; the former promotes our happiness positively by uniting our affections, the latter negatively by restraining our vices. The one encourages intercourse, the other creates distinctions. The first is a patron, the last a punisher.”

-Thomas Paine

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Lessons from Common Sense

  1. Monarchy rarely leads to liberty. Instead, it often leads to tyranny and subjugation of people to the whims of the monarch. Even when there’s a good monarch, it often quickly leads to tyranny after a generation or two.
  2. When you exhaust peaceful and legal means, you have to resort to worse. Paine grants that there were attempts at peaceful recourse first. However, they were not only unfruitful, but even harmful. So, he argues that action has to be taken and that the action must be declaring independence and fighting for it.
  3. You can’t waiver in between submission and rebellion. In his time, there were Americans on both sides of the Revolution, and many who were lukewarm or ready to put up with the tyranny. Paine calls on the American colonists to stand up for their liberty and reclaim it from a motherland that has turned her back on them.

200. Restoring Old Homes with Beauty and Purpose Conversation of Our Generation

I've talked to a couple of architects and discussed the charm of local neighborhoods. In my conversation with Bill Martin, we discussed restoring old homes. And, we talked about his philosophy on how to do that in a way that serves his client and is in keeping with the neighborhood. Furthermore, he does this with sustainability as a primary focus as well. If you're interested in learning more, listen below to understand his philosophy. You can also find more about Bill's work here. https://conversationofourgeneration.com/2021/03/01/restoring-old-homes-with-beauty-and-purpose/(opens in a new tab) "Architecture should speak of its time and place, but yearn for timelessness." -Frank Gehry Restoring Old Homes After a while, homes need to be touched up. Even if they're in good shape, people may want to change them to fit a new style of living. So, restoring old homes is important if we don't want to tear down and rebuild. It is also a more efficient and sustainable way of updating a home than tearing down and rebuilding. The practicality of restoration, I think, is clear. But, there is something to maintaining the character and history of a home and not getting rid of it. Doing it With Beauty And Purpose Bill does this with beauty. He focuses on creating an aesthetically impressive home that is in keeping with the neighborhood. Instead of trying to fuel his ego, he seeks to build something for the client and the community. Building with purpose is another part of this, ensuring that his building serves the client and the community. His approach that recognizes the need to balance these different uses and economic factors is unique. More architects should learn about his philosophy, which he calls E-FABism. "Great buildings that move the spirit have always been rare. In every case they are unique, poetic, products of the heart." -Arthur Erickson — Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conofourgen/support
  1. 200. Restoring Old Homes with Beauty and Purpose
  2. 199. Time to Fight | Lord of the Rings The Two Towers Book Review
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  4. 198. How to Prevent Burnout
  5. 197. What is Virtue? | Book Review Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle

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