fbpx

139. Book Review | Art of War by Sun Tzu

It’s truly amazing the way the wisdom from Art of War has lasted, and most likely will last much longer. There’s tremendous advice relevant to those who may not be in war, but are vying for position or competing in some way. The wisdom in this book is timeless, although it may not apply in the same way.

“If you know the enemy and know yourself you need not fear the results of a hundred battles.”

Sun Tzu

While many of us will never direct troops in a war, we may lead a company, fight a political battle, or coach a team (even if it’s little league). Each of these is like going to war, but with lower costs. And, much of what works for war will work in other battles as well.

Grab your copy of Sun Tzu’s Art of War here.

If you’re looking for a quick, easy read that is packed with wisdom, then check out Art of War. The short excerpts of wisdom are in an easily digestible format and are packed with a lot to contemplate. Like Meditations or the Tao Te Ching, it is a collection of excerpts rather than a large, continuous work. I think this makes it easier to break down and digest what you’re reading.

I really recommend you grab your copy and read it for yourself. Then, let me know what you think.

Enjoy solving today’s problems with the wisdom of the past? Join the Conversation of Our Generation.

211. Elitism and Prideful Disdain | A Nasty Story by Fyordor Dostoevsky Conversation of Our Generation

In Dostoevsky's Nasty Story, we follow the dreadful evening of a prideful bureaucrat. The story follows Ivan Ilyich Pralinsky, as he decides to crash his subordinate's wedding reception. His reason for doing so, whether he admits it or not, is his pride. And, that's what I want to discuss today: how elitism leads people to pride and a disdain for "common people." What is Elitism? Basically, elitism is the idea that a group of wealthy, powerful people deserve their wealth and power. Even if the elites are born into it, they still feel deserving. And, if they're deserving, then the common people they look down on did something to be undeserving. So, it turns out to create a sort of social, political, and financial caste system. The problem is, the self-proclaimed elites aren't always deserving of the praise they seek. So, it can go wrong for them. Humbling the Elites In the past, I've reviewed Dostoevsky's work, and discussed the neuroticism of his characters. Ivan Ilyich Pralinsky is no exception. Throughout this story, he has this inner dialogue where he'll be held up as a hero of the people. But, the story doesn't go the way he planned it. In the end, he is humbled terribly and it shows that the higher one holds himself up, the further he can fall. Pralinsky's elitist attitude blinded him from reality just as our elites are today. If you want to read it, you can find it for free here. For more book reviews and discussions like these, check out my library. For more on this, click here for the full episode and show notes to Elitism and Prideful Disdain. Subscribe to my podcast, wherever you listen, here>> — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/conofourgen/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conofourgen/support
  1. 211. Elitism and Prideful Disdain | A Nasty Story by Fyordor Dostoevsky
  2. 210. Political Action and the Call to "Do Something"
  3. 209. Breaking the Rules of Philosophy
  4. 208. Failures of Modernity and Rationality
  5. 207. Was Lincoln a Good President?

One thought on “139. Book Review | Art of War by Sun Tzu

Add yours

Leave a Reply

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: