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Traditional Architecture Lesson| History of the Pantheon and St. Peter’s

I’ve wanted to do a deep dive into the history of architectural landmarks, and recently got the chance. Frank Cunha, who I’ve been talking to via Twitter, offered to talk about some of the buildings that changed how we look at architecture. So, I took him up on his offer. This lesson on traditional architecture will take a look at the Pantheon and St. Peter’s to see how Christendom adopted Roman architecture. You can also find out more about Frank at his website or follow him on Twitter.

“Architecture should speak of its time and place, but yearn for timelessness.”

Frank Gehry

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Beauty of Traditional Architecture

Truth, beauty, and goodness go together, and they cannot be separated. In order to have a good society, we must value truth and create beauty. Recently, I have talked a lot about restoring beauty in the arts and our architecture, but I don’t have the expertise to give you the background.

So, I’ve tried to find people who know more than me on these things. I’ve spoken about beauty and architecture with Zach the Architect, Stained Glass Zealot, Amy Mastrine, and The Aureus Press. But, this lesson on traditional architecture will be different because it will not only focus on the beauty of architecture, but we’ll dive into the history of some great buildings as well.

History of the Pantheon

The Pantheon is a Roman temple that has had several iterations. Over time, it has been converted to a Catholic church, rebuilt, and renovated. Throughout its storied history, there are instances of tremendous innovation. While the elegance of its design is truly sublime, the history of the Pantheon is incredible as well.

History of St. Peter’s

St. Peter’s Basilica, likewise, has an incredible history. The history of St. Peter’s Basilica as it stands today goes back centuries, and is filled with tough architectural decisions, politics, and strife between artists and the pope. But, what I want to focus on in this conversation is why it was built the way it was and what the architects had to do to give us this tremendous piece of traditional architecture.

236. Materialism & The Human Person | The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly Conversation of Our Generation

According to Wikepedia, "Materialism is a form of philosophical monism that holds that matter is the fundamental substance in nature, and that all things, including mental states and consciousness, are results of material interactions. According to philosophical materialism, mind and consciousness are by-products or epiphenomena of material processes (such as the biochemistry of the human brain and nervous system), without which they cannot exist. This concept directly contrasts with idealism, where mind and consciousness are first-order realities to which matter is subject and material interactions are secondary." Valid Concerns and Good Points At first, it seems to make sense. Much of what we encounter is material. Our food, light, furniture, etc. is all material. It would be easy at first glance to think everything boils down to what is material. But, does that really comport with what we experience and know? Errors of Materialism Materialism leaves out a large chunk of the human experience. First, it fails, like naturalism, to fully account for the supernatural and the spiritual. And, in doing so, it denies free will and many other parts of our experience that are products of the spirit. Also, materialism doesn't allow for the abstract truths we know to be. Moral truths, natural laws, beauty, and even some mathematical truths can't exist if everything is material. So, materialism fails to explain all that we know about the world. Corrections There is more to the world than just the material. It doesn't fit with our understanding of the world. We experience more than just the material in art and music, as well as abstract concepts. We also experience the phenomenon of free will, which is impossible in a materialist world. In order to fully comport with reality, we need to take into account more than material things. In order to fully experience the world, we have to take account for the non-material parts of our lives. Related Episodes in this Series What is Objective Reality? What is Subjective Reality? Unity of Subject and Object The Golden Mean for Understanding Objective and Subjective Reality Naturalism & The Human Person | The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/conofourgen/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/conofourgen/support
  1. 236. Materialism & The Human Person | The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
  2. 235. Naturalism & The Human Person | The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
  3. 234. The Golden Mean for Understanding Objective and Subjective Reality
  4. 233. Is Patriotism Good? | Reflections on the 4th of July
  5. 232. Unity of Subject and Object

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